SPECIAL SESSIONS

If you would like to organize a special session, please send an email to pir3@pitt.edu by 30 September 2019.

CONFIRMED SESSIONS

Session #

Title

Organizer 1

Co-Organizers

Contact 1

Other Contact

1 Seismic structural health monitoring for civil structures Dr. Maria Pina Limongelli (Politecnico di Milano, Italy) Dr. Mehmet Celebi (Earthquake Science Center, USGS, Menlo Park, CA, USA) mariagiuseppina.limongelli@polimi.it  celebi@usgs.gov
2 SHM in Wind Turbine Technology Dr. Wieslaw Ostachowicz (Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland) wieslaw@imp.gda.pl
3 Nonlinear Ultrasonic Guided Wave Methods for SHM Dr. Nitesh Yelve (Fr. C. Rodrigues Institute of Technology, Mumbai, India) niteshyelve@fcrit.ac.in
4 Utilization of the TU1402 benchmark towards enhancement of the Value of SHM Dr. Eleni Chatzi (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology – ETH Zurich) Dr. Helder Sousa (HS Consulting Ltd / BRISA Group, Portugal)Dr. Daniel Straub (Technical University of Munich – TUM)Dr. Sebastian Thons (Technical University of Denmark – DTU) chatzi@ibk.baug.ethz.ch  sebt@byg.dtu.dk mail@hfmsousa.com straub@tum.de
5 Real time monitoring of built infrastructure Vikram Pakrashi and Basuraj Bhowmik (Dynamical Systems and Risk Laboratory University College Dublin, Ireland) Dr. Eleni Chatzi (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology – ETH Zurich) vikram.pakrashi@ucd.ie  basuraj.bhowmik@ucd.ie  chatzi@ibk.baug.ethz.ch
6 Nonlinear SHM methods for high sensitivity Cliff Lissenden (Pennsylvania State University) cjl9@psu.edu
7 Towards the next generation of Performance Indicators supported by SHM Helder Sousa (HS Consulting Ltd / BRISA Group, Portugal) Ana Mandic (University of Zagreb Faculty of Civil Engineering, Croatia)Alfred Strauss (University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Austria) mail@hfmsousa.com mandicka@grad.hr alfred.strauss@boku.ac.at 
8 Standardization and guidelines on SHM and NDT: needs and onging activities Dr. Maria Pina Limongelli (Politecnico di Milano, Italy) S. Kessler (Helmut Schmidt University / University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg)A. Strauss (Boku University) H. Wenzel (WENZEL Consulting Engineers GmbH) mariagiuseppina.limongelli@polimi.it  alfred.strauss@boku.ac.at sylvia.kessler@tum.de
9 Wireless Sensing Systems for Structural Health Monitoring  

Dr. Hailing Fu
Wolfson School of Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, LE11 3TU, UK)

 

Dr. Zahra Sharif-Khodaei

(Department of Aeronautics, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK)


# 1


Seismic structural health monitoring for civil structures

Dr. Maria Pina Limongelli (Politecnico di Milano, Italy)
Dr. Mehmet Celebi (Earthquake Science Center, USGS, Menlo Park, CA)

 

During the last two decades, due to a need and a growing interest by both researchers and professional, seismic structural health monitoring (SHM) has evolved. Numerous monitoring systems installed in structures in various seismic prone countries utilize real-time or near-real-time responses recorded during strong earthquakes to make informed decisions related to the health of their structures . These data have a strategic importance both for the advancement of knowledge on the behavior and performance of structures under strong seismic actions and for the calibration of realistic and reliable numerical models that are aimed to reproduce the structural behavior and to formulate a diagnosis about possible damages. Furthermore, the possibility to assess the seismic vulnerability based on data recorded on the monitored structure opens new avenues in maintenance policies, shifting from a traditional ‘scheduled maintenance’ to a ‘condition-based maintenance’, carried out ‘on demand’ or ‘automatically’, basing on the current structural condition. The aim of this Special Session is to report recent advances in this field and successful applications for civil structures and infrastructures: buildings, bridges, historical structures, dams, wind turbines, pipelines. The session deals with theoretical and computational issues and applications and welcomes contributions that cover, but are not limited to, seismic SHM algorithms for identification and damage detection, requisite strong motion arrays and real time monitoring systems and projects, instrumentation and measurements methods and tools, optimal sensors location, experimental tests, integration of seismic SHM in procedures for risk assessment and emergency management.

Such a session will provide a venue for exchange of information to ongoing developments and assess successes and limited successes of SHM.



# 2


SHM in Wind Turbine Technology

Prof. Wieslaw Ostachowicz

Keywords: wind turbines, sensors, sensing, SHM, damage detection, signal processing

The wind turbine industry has expanded significantly during the last 15 years, and the large offshore wind turbine farms represent important investments. On the other hand, small scale wind turbines represent a segment in the wind energy branch, which is affordable for private individuals and small to medium businesses. The session covers the main Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) topics which are focused on wind turbine structures. The research methodologies used here span a wide range of experimental and numerical approaches in complementary investigations of the rotor with blades, drive train and support structure. The crucial issue is to assess fibre reinforced polymer materials because they are widely used for wind turbine blades. The research methodologies should span a wide range of topics from piezoelectric transducers, elastic waves propagation phenomenon, fibre Bragg gratings, structural vibrations analysis, electro–mechanical impedance method, acoustic emission, damage mechanics, 3D laser vibrometry applications, vibration–based methods, and others. The aspects dedicated to operation, maintenance and the risks associated with damages leading to failure is the crucial issue and needs more advanced technologies. The combination of proposed techniques allows performing efficient both local and global SHM of the structure. It also includes a variety of techniques being related to diagnostics (damage size estimation and damage type recognition) and prognostics. A promising combination of selected techniques should lead to an innovative approach to ensure safe operation of the structure.



# 3


Nonlinear Ultrasonic Guided Wave Methods for SHM

Dr. Nitesh P. Yelve, PhD (Fr. C. Rodrigues Institute of Technology, Vashi Navi, Mumbai, India)

 

Ultrasonic guided waves can travel a long distance without much attenuation and thus, they can scan relatively larger area. Their interaction with small breathing damages, such as closed crack and delamination, produces different nonlinear effects based on the method of interrogating the specimen. These nonlinear effects include higher harmonics, subharmonics, mixed frequency response, and change in resonance frequency. Nonlinear ultrasonic guided wave methods are not only capable of detecting macro damages but also micro damages as small as grains in the material. These techniques can be effectively used for characterizing the materials in order to understand the quality of material produced or being used in an application. The range of application of these methods is large which include SHM of planar structures used in aircrafts, automobiles, power plants, etc. and elongated structures such as rails, pipes, ropes, etc.

A considerable pioneering laboratory work has happened in this domain. The researcher are now working in this domain with the practical perspectives. The objectives include development of:

  • Effective algorithms for damage localization,
  • Energy efficient transducers for actuating and sensing the waves,
  • Damage indices specific to the type of wave used,
  • Techniques for interrogating planar and elongated structures with extended projections/stiffeners,
  • Signal processors with integrated Internet of Things,
  • On-board/insitu damage detection kits, etc.


# 4


Utilization of the TU1402 benchmark towards enhancement of the Value of SHM

Dr. Eleni Chatzi (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology – ETH Zurich)
Dr. Helder Sousa (HS Consulting Ltd / BRISA Group, Portugal)
Dr. Daniel Straub (Technical University of Munich – TUM)
Dr. Sebastian Thons (Technical University of Denmark – DTU)

 

As part of COST Action TU1402 on Quantifying the Value of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM), a simulated benchmark has been established with the aim to serve as a reference case-study for validation of the SHM methods and decision-making tools relying on the Value of Information stemming from monitoring.

Available in https://github.com/ETH-WindMil/benchmarktu1402, the evolution and dissemination of the TU1402 benchmark has been set on the principle of joint-collaboration between partners of the TU1402 action, by assimilating both academic and industrial know-how. The considered system, which serves as a virtual monitored bridge, is modelled with an open access Finite Element code, which is supplemented with a Graphical User Interface (GUI). This enables extraction of modal properties and dynamic response (time-history) data for a number of predefined damage patterns and diverse operational as well as environmental scenarios.

Inspired from this initiative, this special session invites contributions adopting the COST TU1402 numerical benchmark study for:

  • Verification & Validation of methods and tools for system identification & damage detection
  • Reliability Analysis and Decision Support tools for Infrastructure Management
  • We further invite contributions for enhancement of the existing functionalities of this open-source tool with new features and potential applications.
  • We particularly welcome utilization of the benchmark in the context of the Value of Information from SHM


# 5


Special session: Real time monitoring of built infrastructure

Vikram Pakrashi, Basuraj Bhowmik (Dynamical Systems and Risk Laboratory University College Dublin, Ireland)
Eleni Chatzi (Structural Mechanics and Monitoring, ETH Zurich, Switzerland)
Emails: vikram.pakrashi@ucd.iebasuraj.bhowmik@ucd.ie; chatzi@ibk.baug.ethz.ch;

 

Summary: The aim of this special session is to report recent advancements and applications of real time structural health monitoring (SHM) for engineering structures. The session deals with the theoretical and computational issues related to online SHM algorithms for damage identification, stochastic simulation and techniques for recursive modal identification. Contributions are welcome, but are not limited to, real time damage detection algorithms and monitoring systems, recursive modal identification strategies, video and image based online monitoring of systems, strain based identification, energy harvesting techniques for online detection, numerical and computational investigation for online SHM, real time experimental SHM techniques, effect of operational conditions on real time SHM, integration of SHM in risk assessment, estimation of remaining useful life of existing structures based on real time outputs, optimal sensor location and online wireless sensing. The 10th edition of EWSHM will be the ideal forum for sharing and disseminating results of cutting-edge scientific research on real time SHM. The expected attendance of key players from both the development and application areas will offer a comprehensive review on the state-of-the-art view on online monitoring techniques for civil structures and mechanical systems.



# 6


Nonlinear SHM methods for high sensitivity

Cliff J Lissenden (Professor of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University)

Topic Description: early detection of material degradation is a key to a paradigm shift in life-cycle management in many industries; advances are sought in transducers, measurement techniques, signal processing, and correlating measurements with material microstructure.



# 7


Towards the next generation of Performance Indicators supported by SHM

Helder Sousa (HS Consulting Ltd / BRISA Group, Portugal)
Ana Mandic (University of Zagreb Faculty of Civil Engineering, Croatia)
Alfred Strauss (University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Austria)

Most roadway bridges belonging to the so-called core of the European transport infrastructure have been built as part of the post- World War II reconstruction effort. This means that society is progressively facing the beginning of the end of their designing lifetime, and, from a more technical point of view, bridge management is becoming more and more influenced by lifecycle multiobjective performance criteria. For an efficient approach, this needs to be wisely reflected on the selection and proper quantifying of so-called Performance Indicators to assist bridge management and mainly from a sustainability point of view. This is in line with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development promoted by the UN in 2015 towards a sustainable planet.
In this context, and further to an up-to-date European review of Performance Indicators towards a sustainable road bridge management , this session welcomes to those with interest to give evidence on the effective utilization of SHM techniques (including NDT methods) towards a better quantification of the aforementioned Performance Indicators. In simple words, contributions that are able to show clearly the assessment of a specific Performance Indicator supported with and without the aforementioned technique(s) are ideally positioned to take part on the next generation of Performance Indicators supported by SHM.



# 8

 

Standardization and guidelines on SHM and NDT: needs and onging activities

M.P. Limongelli (Politecnico di Milano)
S. Kessler (Helmut Schmidt University / University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg)
A. Strauss (Boku University)
H. Wenzel (WENZEL Consulting Engineers GmbH)

Structural health monitoring (SHM) and non-destructive testing (NDT) are strategic tools for the non invasive assessment of the structural health state. Whilst research on these topics has seen important developments in the last 30years, their large scale application proceeds with a slower pace. The developement of standards and guidelines can provide an effective support to designers and managers and foster the practical implementation of these technologies to real world cases.

The aim of this Special Session is to bring together researchers and professionals to foster discussion and exchange of information about the ongoing activities related to the development of standards and guidelines on SHM and NDT.

Potential topics of the Session include, but are not limited to: sensors, structural and damage identification, SHM supported life-cycle performance assessment, design by testing, NDT testing, SHM supported decision making, uncertainties quantification, performance indicators, case studies.



# 9

 

Wireless Sensing Systems for Structural Health Monitoring

 Dr. Hailing Fu (Wolfson School of Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, LE11 3TU, UK)

Dr. Zahra Sharif-Khodaei (Department of Aeronautics, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK)

 

Keywords: Wireless Sensor Networks, SHM, Low-Power Sensing, Energy Harvesting, Wireless Communication

 

Structural Health Monitoring has been one of the major technologies to detect, evaluate and guarantee structural integrity. This technology has also been investigated and applied in many fields, including aircraft, wind turbines, railway systems and bridges. One of the drawbacks of actual SHM systems for large-scale monitoring applications is wiring complexity and associated extra weight. This challenge can be solved through wireless sensors using specific sensors design, miniaturization and wireless technology. Power consumption would be another big concern in wireless sensing systems for SHM for long-term distributed operations. How to design energy efficient wireless sensing system is one of the challenges. Energy harvesting, as an alternative to conversion batteries, would be a solution to implement self-powered solutions. The aim of the special session is to bring experts in wireless sensing systems for SHM to exchange information and generate new ideas in novel wireless sensing systems for SHM. The scope, therefore, includes, but not limited to:

  • New Miniaturized Sensor Design
  • Low power sensing systems
  • Wireless sensors
  • Energy harvesting for self-powered systems
  • Wireless data acquisition system development
  • Applications of wireless systems in SHM